. barnhart apartments

 

1929

1121 6 Street SW

The Barnhart Apartments is a three-storey apartment block built by its owner, building contractor C. E. Barnhart, during the late-1920’s building boom in the City that ended with the Great Depression.  The Barnhart Apartments replaced a house at 704 - 12 Avenue S.W., the home of Minnie Braden from about 1912 until her death in 1927. Braden, the sister of Calgary Herald founder Thomas B. Braden, worked for the Land Titles Office and had once headed the City’s government weather bureau.

C. E. Barnhart was Vancouver building contractor who apparently lived in Calgary part-time in 1929.  That summer, he completed and opened the Barnhart Model Home, a Tudor Revival-style residence in Mount Royal that still stands at 1011 Prospect Avenue S.W.  Both the model home and the Barnhart Apartments were designed by a Vancouver architect, Major R. T. Perry.  A building permit for the apartment building was issued in May 1929.

The Calgary Albertan and the Calgary Daily Herald published features on the new Barnhart Apartments on Oct. 19, 1929.  Both features described the twenty-five suite building (an annex, now demolished, housed an additional five suites) in detail, and both papers characterized the Barnhart Apartments as luxurious.  A sampling of Henderson’s Directory listings reveals that its early tenants included professionals, business managers, and white collar office workers.  Notable occupants included: Douglas Lougheed, the son of Senator James A. Lougheed and son-in-law of Dr. Thomas Henry Blow (1930-31); and Roosevelt S. Olson, a co-founder of Western Canada Greyhound Lines (circa 1934-35).

The building is constructed in the Tudor Revival style and features; gabled roof, half timbering, rough cast stucco cladding on upper levels with brick on the lower level, bay windows, and, an arched entranceway with stone details.  Located near the mansions of the wealthy, it was a prestigious address, and is of importance in maintaining the dominant character of the street.

 

 

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